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Sep 20

Go easy at clean-up time

It seems there’s nothing gardeners want to do more at this time of year than get outside and rake and clip and tidy their yards. Yet a lot of what is being removed in fall and spring clean-up is actually really needed out there, by plants or wildlife.

This includes:

-Seedheads.  Leave the seed for the birds – chickadees like to break into the Milkweed pods, migrant sparrows will be all over the fluffy heads of Joe Pye Weed, goldfinches go at the Sunflowers and Coneflowers….  Nearly everything is a resource for something. But the seeds of weeds you want to stop from spreading are best put in the fire or otherwise disposed of (although weed seeds are a resource for birds if you don’t get round to it).
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Aug 31

No chemicals used on these plants – next sale Saturday September 13

The colour is great at this time of year – the strong reds and mauves of phlox contrasting with the varying yellows of Tall Coreopsis, Black-eyed Susan, Helen’s Flower and Lance-leaved Goldenrod.  And the New England Asters haven’t even come out yet.

But it’s not just the colour that delights an ecological gardener – it’s the life!

I sit and watch, and there’s so much activity – the goldfinches swooping down to the birdbath, hummingbirds hovering at the Giant Blue Lobelia (no, wait, that’s a hummingbird moth!), a Monarch butterfly dancing through the chokecherries, winged creatures buzzing between the blue spires of Anise Hyssop and the fluffly pink heads of Joe Pye Weed, catching the sunlight as they dart from bloom to bloom.Read more
Jun 30

Gardening with heart: creating space for the Monarch

I don’t often stop when I’m driving to take pictures of people’s gardens – but something caught my eye in a small front yard on a busy Toronto street that had me braking in to the next driveway and dashing back with a camera.

It was a narrow strip of a bed, defined by a paved path up to the front door on one side, a driveway on the other, and completely filled with Common Milkweed (Ascelpias syriaca), its dusky pink flowers just now coming into bloom.

This, I thought, is gardening with heart. Milkweed once grew across North America, hosting the astonishing annual migration of the Monarch butterfly from Mexico to Canada. It takes six generations to get from south to north in a summer, and while the Monarch (like all butterflies), can get nectar from a wide variety of plants, the Monarch (like all butterflies) lays its eggs on one specific plant, or family of plants, which its larvae (caterpillars) have evolved to be able to consume.Read more